Missouri: Still Divided

June 25, 2019

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Approximately 880 miles southwest of Manhattan, on the Mississippi River, St.Louis, Missouri consists of 308,626 people; with a growth rate of -1.44%. Missouri became a state on August 10, 1821 and was a slave state until January 11, 1865. The city of St. Louis is also historically known for holding one of the biggest court hearings in African American history. The Dred Scott v. Sanford case, where Dred Scott, his wife Harriet Scott, and his two daughters Eliza and Lizzie fought for his freedom because he felt that he was not being treated fairly as a U.S. citizen due to him being a African American. He was unable to claim himself as a citizen but only as property. The Dred Scott case was one of the many things that led to the Civil War. One thing the Justifeyed team noticed while traveling around Missouri and St. Louis is how segregated it was, a mere 18 minutes could change your surroundings drastically. Many times you would only see one large group of one race in one area, then travel some ways and you were transferred into a completely different pool of people. The races below are some of the most common races that make up the demographics in St. Louis.

 

African American: 47.61%

White: 45.89% 

Asian: 3.11%

Two or more races: 2.10% 

Other race: 0.95% 

Native American: 0.28% 

Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander: 0.06%

 

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As of April 2017, St. Louis had the highest murder rate in America, and today remains at the top of the charts for its crime rates. The four most common violent offenses are murder, non-negligent manslaughter (any death caused by injuries received in a fight, arugument, quarrel, or assault), rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Approximately 23.8%  of the area residents live below the poverty line, which is 9.8% higher than the national average. The St. Louis area is also among the highest rates of racial segergation in America. 24/7 Wall St. determined last year that St. Louis was one of the three worst American cities to live in 2018. The numbers below show how many homicides, property crimes, and forcible rapes happened in 2018.

 

Homicides: 11.1

Total property crime: 2,490.2 

Forcible rape: 38.1 

 

In 2018, close to 186 homicides occurred in the city of St. Louis, in addition, St. Louis was ranked among the most dangerous cities in the United States. 

 

After reading the information above you may get the misconception that St. Louis is all bad, but that is not what we want you to think, there are many things in St. Louis that are interesting and unique such as their symphony orchestra, which is the second-oldest in the country, they are home to  one of the best medical schools in the nation, and have the tallest monument in America: the Gateway Arch. St. Louis is also known for the many charitable donations they make, along with its many community volunteers.

 

The biggest thing Justifeyed wants to give to you after reading this is one, you are now educated about the great city of St. Louis and the great state of Missouri and two, when traveling, you are making sure that you are safe, alert, and proactive. Because no matter where you go, you should always be aware of your surroundings, crimes, and activities that happen in your area. Justifeyed will be able to provide you with all of this information right to your fingertips to keep you and your family safe no matter where you go. Will you be the person to step forward and speak up to potentially help millions? 

              Justifeyed's Petition

 

Marcus Evans, I am the creator and founder and my daughter Raianna Evans is the co-founder of our mobile safety app . Justifeyed will be able to provide live video feed to a dispatcher so they can see your situation and get help to you quicker and more efficiently. I am petitioning to get a bill sent to legislation to improve our 9-1-1 system, while my daughter is petitioning to give all schools one unified app to help in an emergency. With your help we can improve our 9-1-1 system and schools and potentially ensure a quicker and more efficient way for dispatchers to respond to emergencies. Step up and step out, every signature counts. Will you help to make a change?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Justifeyed-Eye To Eye Live Video To Emergency Dispatchers (JLVD) Act 2020

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/justifeyed-eye-eye-live-video-emergency-dispatchers-jlvd-act-2020

 

RAIANNA’S LIVE VIDEO, UNIFIED SCHOOL SAFETY APP ACT OF 2020

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/rihannas-live-video-unified-school-safety-app-act-2020

    

#Justifeyed

 

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